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PLEASE CHOOSE YOUR LANGUAGE, IF YOU’RE NOT ON THE RIGHT SITE. THANK YOU.

OK, GOT IT

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Award-winning classic

Red lustre glaze

The distinctive red glaze or “Kähler’s red lustre” was created on a white base and changed between soft rose grey, deep copper red and pale purple depending on where the products had been placed in the kiln.

The special lustre glaze has been used for more than 1000 years, but inventively, Kähler’s skilled artists started dipping entire objects into the lustre glaze. Until then, lustre glaze had only been used to paint decorations.

The new way of using the beautiful red lustre was one of the reasons why Kähler receiving the silver medal at the Paris Exposition of 1889. After that, the red lustre became a bestseller at Kähler from around 1889 until around 1910, during which period it was also sold outside Denmark. Both Herman A. Kähler (1846-1917) and Karl Hansen Reistrup (1863-1929) worked with the red lustre.

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Iconic

Svend Hammershøi

The artist Svend Hammershøi (1873-1948) was one of Kähler’s regular designers from around 1910 until his death. You can recognize Hammershøi’s ceramics by their organic shapes, small delicate decorations and vertical furrows. Hammershøi’s ceramics was usually made of earthenware, but you may be lucky and stumble upon a salt-glazed piece of stoneware.
Svend Hammershøi’s products are decorated with various glazes – e.g. the black/white double glaze, which was also called grey lustre. However, some of his works are unglazed and simply waxed in red and black colours. All Hammershøi’s products underwent a special process. He was in charge of the design and then the skilled craftsmen at the workshop would create the vessels on the potter’s wheel. Finally, the artist Jens Thirslund would often be in charge of the glazes. So each product is the result of close collaboration between several skilled artists.

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The popular

Horn painting

The popular horn painting is based on an old tradition from circa 1400s. Kähler used horn painting from 1839 – but from around 1905 to 1950, this type of products became a Kähler hallmark. The horn painting is named after the cow’s horn into which a goose feather was inserted. This served as a type of fountain pen when e.g. the vases were to be decorated with slip colours. Originally, such products were made in white on a red base.
A special type of horn painting is “wet-in-wet”. With this type of technique, the artists basically let gravity decide how the colours mixed on the vase. However, sometimes the painting ladies would use a feather or a stick to control the process. Usually, you will not be able to see whom of the painting ladies painted the individual products; however, sometimes the really skilled painters, such as Tulle Emborg (1896-1980), were allowed to write their signature on the bottom.

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Marvellous

Thrown money banks

Thrown animals or money banks are a classic for many potters, and the Kähler workshop naturally made its own versions. From 1839, the workshop made conventional piggy banks: a newly thrown plate was folded into the backside, four legs, a couple of ears and then a tail was added and a slot would be cut out for coins. That was also how piggy banks were made back in the 1500s.

However, towards the end of the 1920s, Nils Kähler (1906-1979) started doing some experiments. Now thrown animals were also made as birds, fish and many other animals. Just as all the other products the money banks were made in collaboration between the creative throwers and painting ladies. This meant that all money banks were decorated individually so that no two are alike. So already from the beginning, they made collectors’ items.

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Beautiful

Small sculptures and figurines

Around 1920, Kähler decided to promote good art so that more people would be able to enjoy art on a daily basis. Kähler did this by casting small ceramic sculptures – especially Kai Nielsen’s (1882-1924) figures were extremely popular. As many as 18 different models with different glazes were produced from around 1921. Some of the 18 models were produced in the old moulds until the beginning of the 21st century.

Other recognized artists who also designed both small and large sculptures at Kähler include Carl Bonnesen (1868-1933), Knud Kyhn (1880-1969) and Ib Wolffbrandt (1919-1993).

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The story behind

The HAK logo

The historical HAK logo has adorned all Kähler products since 1913. However, the HAK logo goes much further back.

HAK is an abbreviation of Herman August Kähler (1846-1917), the son of Kähler’s founder. It was also Herman A. Kähler who created the historical Kählersbakken, where Kähler is now headquartered. As artistic manager of the Kähler workshop, he was already in 1872 given the great honour of having his initials on the bottom of some of the ceramic art works.

In 1913, Svend Hammershøi compiled the letters into the HAK logo, which since then has been mandatory on the bottom of all Kähler works.

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